Build a robot Course (9 June)

Build a robot to use with the BBC Micro:bit.

Course venue: Westacre Middle School, Droitwich, WR9 0AA

A short high impact course for teachers

Ideal for
Head of Computing ICT/Computing teachers – Secondary or Primary Phase

You will build a BBC Micro:bit robot that is yours to keep. Once built you will be shown how to program your robot using programming blocks just like Scratch.  This course demystifies the tech and is suitable for everyone.

  • A great way to introduce robotics
  • Step by step instructions to built your robot
  • Fun, hands on training for staff that you can use in the classroom
  • We will show you how to write programs to control your robot
  • The robot is yours to keep at the end of the course!

A fantastic way to make best use of this importance device. 

  • All you need to know about the hardware and how to program it
  • You will learn how to write programs for your robot using the block editor
  • You can purchase additional robots for just £25 each
  • No coding or technical experience needed – this course is suitable for everyone

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £69 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

Pupils online: advice for schools

We know that children are using a wide range of technology to get online at home, including games consoles, tablets and even their parents’ smartphones. This has led to a number of concerns, the main one being the issue of safeguarding. With the huge variety of potential access points to the internet, how can schools educate their pupils for all eventualities?

At Catshill Learning Partnerships, we’ve been running online safety presentations in schools for a number of years, and at the beginning of these sessions, we always ask the pupils what devices they’ve been using or had access to at home. The responses to this are always really fascinating; children from as early as reception are already using a vast range of technology. So, we set up the Pupil Internet Use Survey in order to examine how children access online content in more detail.

Unchartered territory

The main problem with technology is that schools and parents alike aren’t necessarily familiar with the ways in which their pupils and children are accessing online content. For example, games consoles can now be used to communicate with other players around the world, and also access platforms such as YouTube and even Facebook.

There is evidence that a lot of really young children are using their mum and dad’s smartphones. Of course, young pupils tend to be quite adept at using these types of technology, and will often help struggling parents or grandparents to get to grips with their devices.

While filtering and restriction systems can help limit the content that children can access on their devices, if that device is taken to a friend’s house, the same controls may not apply, so understanding exactly what can be accessed and how is essential for parents. We’re encouraging teachers to ask these sorts of questions to both students and parents, to ensure that these considerations are taken into account.

Addressing the issue

The main thing is to make sure that what they’re doing with the technology is done safely so that they’re not putting themselves in danger by going to a site that’s not suitable, and when they’re online that they’re behaving in an appropriate way. The most important thing to check is that they’re not sharing personal information publicly or with strangers online without considering what they’re doing.

Children often won’t see the harm in posting content about themselves, especially if their parents are doing the same thing. Part of the problem is that not everyone understands the privacy settings on platforms like Facebook, meaning that their content is available publicly for the world to see. Parents need to lead by example and take the time to consider their own social media channels.

This being said, there are many new social apps beyond the big players like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, such as Yik Yak and Oovoo. It’s difficult to keep on top of all this, simply because there are new developments all the time, so what’s needed is general messaging to raise awareness and ideas. Schools should run regular sessions for both their staff and parents to ensure that everyone has the latest information and that they understand what’s out there!

Voice of the children

Everyone has a responsibility when it comes to online safety, whether that’s parents, teachers, or even students. I’m keen for schools to set up Digital Leader programmes, where groups of students are able to pass on messages about safety in a voice that other young people are more likely to resonate with. There’s also the opportunity for students to help in writing the school’s online safety guide, as they will often have more insight into the newer trends online for people their age, and consequently, become your most valuable resource in this process.

There are so many devices that now utilise internet connections, whether it’s a smartphone, a television, a kettle or even a dog collar! We’re getting so used to these new technological developments within the “Internet of Things”, but we need to take a step back and evaluate the risks, so that everyone understands the multitude of possibilities online and how they can be managed effectively and safely.

BBC Micro:bit course (12 June)

Make the most of your free BBC computers and find out what they can do…

Course venue: Hales Valley Teaching School, Halesowen, West Midlands, B63 1BU

A short high impact course for teachers

bbc-microbitThe Micro:bit is designed to encourage children to get actively involved in writing software for computers and building new things, rather than being consumers of media. A million devices have been given to every year 7 pupil in the UK.  This course demystifies the tech and explains how to make the most of your devices.

  • Don’t let your free BBC Micro:bits end up in dusty cupboards
  • Fun, hands on training for staff
  • We will show you how to write programs and ensure that you are familiar with the hardware
Ideal for
Head of Computing ICT/Computing teachers – Secondary or Primary Phase

A fantastic way to make best use of this importance device. 

  • All you need to know about the hardware and how to program it
  • You will learn how to write programs using the block editor, touch develop and python
  • How to connect to other devices such as an LED and headphones
  • No coding or technical experience needed – this course is suitable for everyone
“Good to discuss with other teachers.” Chris Howard, Abbey Park Middle School “I found the hands on coding really useful and I am looking forward to teaching some of this to our current year 7’s.” Richard Martin, Abbey Park Middle School “The course is a very useful introduction to the hardware and coding activities that can be carried out with the BBC micro:bit. It gives you the opportunity to try some hands on activities with the micro:bit.” Cheryl Jarvis, Catshill Middle School “Good short introduction – great overview of functionality and applications available. Brett is very engaging and maintains a good pace throughout.” Carolyn Aynsworth, Malvern St James Girls’ School

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

Scratch Course (4 July)

Hands on training using the brilliant free programming tool.

Course venue: Westacre Middle School, Droitwich, WR9 0AA

A short high impact course for teachers

Scratch unifyscratchexample
Ideal for
Head of Computing ICT/Computing teachers – Secondary or Primary Phase

Based on the award winning and free software package Scratch which has been developed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT, this practical course assumes no prior knowledge.

Scratch is a free visual programming language used to easily create animations, games, etc. and is an important stepping stone in the world of computer programming.

  • A cost effective way of implementing programming.
  • Uses fun, exciting and free software that encourages high level thinking and creativity.
  • Can be used with year 3 to year 9.
  • Covers the interface, sprites, command blocks and everything you need to know.
  • Linked to the computing programme of study.

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

360 E-Safe Preparation (6 July)

Preparing for the 360safe E-Safety review

Course venue: Hales Valley Teaching School, Halesowen, West Midlands, B63 1BU

A short high impact course for teachers

360-degree-safe-quick-start

Ideal for
Senior leaders/Safeguarding lead/Computing/ICT lead – Secondary or Primary Phase

Help with completing the 360safe online safety review in order to ensure that online safety is embedded across your school.

  • Explaining the elements, strands and aspects of the tool
  • Policy and Leadership
  • Infrastructure
  • Education
  • Standards and Inspection

This course will cover the key areas required and help you to complete the 360safe online safety review and/or get ready for assessment.

  • A process for identifying strengths and weaknesses of existing practice
  • Responsibilities and relevant stakeholders
  • Help in identifying your existing levels
  • Guidance and best practice
  • Templates and updates using best practices
  • An action plan for your school

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

Internet Use Survey – Free resource

Interpreting the results of the National Pupil Internet Use Survey

The free classroom resource

Schools across the UK were invited to take part in a national survey of internet use by pupils when at home. Over 19,000 pupils took part.

A free teaching resource that uses the results from the survey which were published for Safer Internet Day 2017 has been created for schools to use. 

The resource presents a series of questions made up  into 26 slides that can be delivered in the classroom as it is or modified to suit a range of ages and abilities. It can be used to promote and stimulate online safety discussion.

Complete the form below to receive the classroom resource.

You can also download the results of the survey here.

Your Name

Your Email

School

Postcode

Country if non-UK

Position in school (eg head teacher, ICT Co-ordinator etc)

Please send me a copy of the National Pupil Internet Use Survey classroom resource

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Children online – 19,000 surveyed

Pupils online: National survey of 19,000 UK pupils reveals new trends in children’s internet use

Download the survey result below.

  • The results of a national pupil survey on internet use have been released, taking data from over 60 schools and 19,000 pupils
  • Primary-aged pupils are most frequently using tablets and smartphones to access the internet
  • With greater access to the internet, concerns have been raised around the content that is accessible by young children, and how this can be combated effectively

Catshill Learning Partnerships, along with education technology association, Naace, have announced the results from a national survey of pupils’ internet use at home.

The survey, which involved over 60 schools and over 19,000 pupils from across the UK, asked questions about the devices young people are using to get online. As expected, the results show that children of all ages are using a wide range of devices, but the figures for very young children surprisingly revealed that over 60 per cent of four to five-year-olds are using tablets to get online. The tablet is the online device of choice for primary children, but for secondary school-aged children, the smartphone is the most popular choice.

Key figures from the study show that:

  • Nearly half of four to seven-year-old children surveyed say they are using a smartphone to get online
  • 66 per cent of Year 7 pupils and 89 per cent of Year 10 pupils use a smartphone, which is the most popular method of accessing the internet
  • Over half of six-year-olds use a laptop to get online
  • Games consoles are used mostly by 10 and 11-year-olds with three main platforms (Xbox, Playstation and Wii) being popular
  • A wide range of other connected devices were being used at home. The most popular devices in the ‘Internet of Things’ category were other consoles such as the Nintendo DS, heating controls, smart meters and portable media devices. Smart fridges and kettles were mentioned but less common.

Edtech and online safety consultant, Brett Laniosh, from Catshill Learning Partnerships said, “We now know that children are using a wide range of technology to get online at home, but the findings for younger children will surprise many. The fact that so many four and five-year-olds are using smartphones and tablets to access what could be unfiltered content is of concern and one that is echoed by the Children’s Commissioners report “Growing up Digital” released earlier this month.

“We would encourage schools to find out what devices their pupils are using at home and then compare their results with the national average.” Brett added, “I would also encourage schools to heed the advice of the Children’s Commissioner and establish Digital Leaders in school to get young people involved with the delivery of online safety education. For parents, it is vital to speak with your children to find out what hardware they have access to and which ones are being used to access online content. The discussion should also cover whether they are being used appropriately, for example protecting personal privacy and spending an appropriate amount of time using them.”

Download the Survey Results here

 

About Catshill Learning Partnerships:

Catshill Learning Partnerships is an independent computing, ICT and e-safety consultant network, providing curriculum support to schools. Established in 2011, its school-based services also include professional development and educational technology advice.

Catshill Learning Partnerships are Naace Delivery Partners. A national network of trusted educational organisations who work together to provide quality support services for schools.

For more details, please email info@catshill.com or ring 01527 313 880

 

About Naace:

Naace is the national association for everyone promoting learning with technology in a connected world.  Naace is the professional association for those concerned with advancing education by capitalising on the opportunities of the connected world and technology. This involves advancing pedagogy and ensuring that strong computing knowledge and skills are spread to all pupils and all teachers. The Naace community provides support and professional development opportunities for teachers and school leaders.  Our membership also includes advisers, consultants and industry partners.  Naace administers the ICT Mark and the Self-review Framework and has developed the Third Millennium Learning award to enable schools to share their insights on how to take education to the next level.

http://www.naace.co.uk

 

 

Short High Impact Courses

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Held at conveniently located Centres of Excellence with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience
LocationCentre of Excellence
DroitwichWestacre Middle School
RedditchThe Vaynor First School
WorcesterThe Chantry School

Find out more about the courses

Curriculum planning

How to implement an effective computing curriculum. Covers the complete programme of study. Ideal for those who have to teach computing.

A short high impact course for teachers

planning materials

Ideal for
Head of Computing/ ICT and Computing teachers – Secondary or Primary Phase

This course covers the complete Computing programme of study including ICT and Digital Literacy.

  • Plan a meaningful curriculum that can be delivered by all your staff.
  • How to deliver exciting lessons in order to meet statutory requirements.
  • Technological words explained, so that you will understand difficult concepts such as algorithms and abstraction.
  • Complete coverage from reception to year nine.

Key resources and practical advice

  • A staff survey that can be used to record understanding and confidence levels.
  • A list of objectives and complete curriculum overview for every year that you can use straight away.
  • Use and create programmes using award winning and free software.
  • Review of schemes of work.

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

This course does not yet have a date and venue. To express an interest, please complete the form and we will contact you when details are available.

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I am interested in attending the following short course:
E-Safety Policy updateDigital leaders in your school360 E-Safe self review preparationOnline safety for school staffSocial Media for schoolsPlanning and delivering the computing curriculumUsing Scratch to teach computingApps for teaching computingBBC Micro:bit training for schoolsBBC Micro:bit RoboticsBBC Micro:bit Physical ComputingPreparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessmentGreen Screen and iMovie in the classroom

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Naace ICT Mark Course

Preparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessment

A short high impact course for teachers

ictmark

Ideal for
ICT lead/Head of Computing/ Senior leaders – Primary or Secondary Phase

This course is will help schools who are working through the Self-review Framework (SRF) and towards the ICT Mark. It is also suitable for schools who are considering ICT Mark assessment.

Each element of the SRF will be clarified. Information and resources to help understand the evidence required for assessment will be provided.

Areas of focus 

  • An understanding of the elements of the SRF
  • Consistency in applying judgements of threshold for the ICT Mark
  • Identifying and working with relevant and important stakeholders in school
  • The assessment process – How it works and what type of evidence you require
  • Be able to identify an appropriate route though the SRF and plan the journey

Elements covered

  • Leadership and Management
  • Planning and Learning
  • Computing and Capability
  • Evaluating the impact of ICT
  • Professional Development and Resources

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

This course does not yet have a date and venue. To express an interest, please complete the form and we will contact you when details are available.

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E-Safety Policy updateDigital leaders in your school360 E-Safe self review preparationOnline safety for school staffSocial Media for schoolsPlanning and delivering the computing curriculumUsing Scratch to teach computingApps for teaching computingBBC Micro:bit training for schoolsBBC Micro:bit RoboticsBBC Micro:bit Physical ComputingPreparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessmentGreen Screen and iMovie in the classroom

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Apps for Computing course

Hands on training  to show the best tools and apps for teaching computing on tablets

A short high impact course for teachers

 

 iPad-Air-vs-iPad-miniscratchjr

 

Ideal for
Any teacher or TA that teaches computing – Primary Phase

Programming can be challenging without a keyboard but there are some great apps out there that can be used to to deliver the computing curriculum.

This course will cover a range of recommended apps for use on iPads and Android tablets.

  • Recommended, proven free apps
  • Covered  apps – Pyonkee, Snap!, Touch Develop, J2Code, 2Code, Kodable,  Hopscotch
  • Hands on in detail with ScratchJr, Run Marco and Lightbot
  • Gives schools a cost effective way of implementing programming
  • Suitable for all teachers regardless of their teaching and
    training experience
  • Linked to the computing programme of study

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

This course does not yet have a date and venue. To express an interest, please complete the form and we will contact you when details are available.

Your Name

Your Email

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Postcode

Position in school eg head teacher, safeguarding lead, ICT Co-ordinator

I am interested in attending the following short course:
E-Safety Policy updateDigital leaders in your school360 E-Safe self review preparationOnline safety for school staffSocial Media for schoolsPlanning and delivering the computing curriculumUsing Scratch to teach computingApps for teaching computingBBC Micro:bit training for schoolsBBC Micro:bit RoboticsBBC Micro:bit Physical ComputingPreparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessmentGreen Screen and iMovie in the classroom

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Online Safety for School Staff

Essential information for school staff

A short high impact course for teachers

Ideal for
All staff/NQTs/TAs – Secondary or Primary Phase

The essential things you need to know about how you and your pupils can stay safe online and referring to the DFE statutory guidance ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education’.

  • Technology in use at home including the Internet of Things
  • Personal and professional issues
  • Vulnerability
  • Grooming
  • Cyber-bullying
  • Sexting
  • Radicalisation
  • Social media including Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and Instagram

As well as the areas above, this course gives helpful guidance to teachers about protecting their online identity and suggests practical steps that schools can use to implement effective E-Safety procedures.

  • Protecting yourself – practical advice
  • Key stakeholders – parents, governors, safeguarding boards, agencies such as CEOP and Childnet
  • Essential resources and proven strategies
  • Best practice
  • Reporting procedures

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

This course does not yet have a date and venue. To express an interest, please complete the form and we will contact you when details are available.

Your Name

Your Email

Your Phone

Your School

Postcode

Position in school eg head teacher, safeguarding lead, ICT Co-ordinator

I am interested in attending the following short course:
E-Safety Policy updateDigital leaders in your school360 E-Safe self review preparationOnline safety for school staffSocial Media for schoolsPlanning and delivering the computing curriculumUsing Scratch to teach computingApps for teaching computingBBC Micro:bit training for schoolsBBC Micro:bit RoboticsBBC Micro:bit Physical ComputingPreparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessmentGreen Screen and iMovie in the classroom

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Green screen iMovie course

The use of Green Screen and iMovie to enhance learning in the classroom.

A short high impact course for teachers

Ideal for
Computing co-ordinators/Class teachers/NQTs  – Primary Phase

This is a practical course which will enable you to become computing proficient in using a green screen.  It is not essential to have a green screen within your school – learn how to make one of your own!  In addition, you will learn how to create BAFTA award winning iMovies to enhance the children’s learning experience across the curriculum.

  • How does a green screen impact on children’s learning?
  • How to use a green screen.
  • How to create a DIY green screen.
  • How to merge green screen clips using an iPad/ MacBook for dummies 🙂
  • How to use iMovies to enhance children’s learning across all curriculum areas.

This course is presented by Sophie Thomas. Although not essential, it would be helpful to bring a Macbook or iPad to this course.

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

This course does not yet have a date and venue. To express an interest, please complete the form and we will contact you when details are available.

Your Name

Your Email

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Your School

Postcode

Position in school eg head teacher, safeguarding lead, ICT Co-ordinator

I am interested in attending the following short course:
E-Safety Policy updateDigital leaders in your school360 E-Safe self review preparationOnline safety for school staffSocial Media for schoolsPlanning and delivering the computing curriculumUsing Scratch to teach computingApps for teaching computingBBC Micro:bit training for schoolsBBC Micro:bit RoboticsBBC Micro:bit Physical ComputingPreparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessmentGreen Screen and iMovie in the classroom

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Ideas for Safer Internet Day

10 things you can do in the run up to Safer Internet Day 2017

sid2017

1Set up digital leaders or if you have a team bring them to a workshopFind out how
2Review your AUPs and online safety policiesFind out how
3Run a workshop for parentsFind out how
4Carry out a survey of internet use by pupilsFind out how
5Get your digital leaders to produce an e-safety game or blogFind out how
6Create an e-safety game in ScratchFind out how
7Run an online event for all your classesFind out how
8Get your pupils to run a showcase lesson for parents Find out how
9Update your staff on the new DfE guidelinesFind out how
10Carry out a review using the 360 ESafe toolFind out how

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Micro classrooms

Government to implement MicroClassrooms following the MicroPub Revolution

Following the phenomenal rise of the MicroPub, the UK Government is recommending that schools should start to use cupboards as micro-classrooms. “Putting pupils and teachers in cupboards makes a lot of sense for schools looking to reduce budgets and make the most of limited room”, an Education Minister has said.

The MicroPub revolution began when Martyn Hillier turned a former butcher’s shop in the Kent village of Herne into a pub. The MicroPub focuses on cask ales, good conversation and friendly atmosphere.  MicroPubs are now appearing across the UK with 300 now open.  A Government spokesperson announced today (1/4/2017) that the micro pub model  could effectively be applied to classrooms resulting in considerable cost savings for schools looking to cut budgets.

E-Safety Policies Course

Review and update your online safety policies and procedures.

A short high impact course for teachers

policyprocedure

Ideal for
Safeguarding/Computing/ICT lead – Secondary or Primary Phase

An opportunity to update your e-safety, password and acceptable use policies in accordance with the DFE’s statutory guidance ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education‘ released in September 2016.

  • Working with your existing policies or using our provided templates
  • E-Safety policies
  • Acceptable Use Policies
  • Password Policy
  • Ofsted and inspection preparation

This course will cover the key areas required for your e-safety policies to ensure they are fit for purpose.

  • A review of your existing policies
  • Guidance and best practice
  • Templates and updates using best practices
  • E-Safety audits
  • Question and Answer session

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

This course does not yet have a date and venue. To express an interest, please complete the form and we will contact you when details are available.

Your Name

Your Email

Your Phone

Your School

Postcode

Position in school eg head teacher, safeguarding lead, ICT Co-ordinator

I am interested in attending the following short course:
E-Safety Policy updateDigital leaders in your school360 E-Safe self review preparationOnline safety for school staffSocial Media for schoolsPlanning and delivering the computing curriculumUsing Scratch to teach computingApps for teaching computingBBC Micro:bit training for schoolsBBC Micro:bit RoboticsBBC Micro:bit Physical ComputingPreparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessmentGreen Screen and iMovie in the classroom

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Social Media for schools

The essential guide to promoting your school safely using social media.

A short high impact course for teachers

social-media-course

Ideal for
Senior staff/ Business Managers/ Administrators / Technical  support – Secondary or Primary Phase

If you are looking to raise the profile of your school, social media should be an integral part of your marketing strategy. This hands on course will show you how to use social media such as Twitter and LinkedIn to raise the profile of your school, increase your influence and engage more widely with your community and target audiences such as prospective parents.

Using Social Media safely

In order to protect your school, we will give you guidelines to ensure your campaign is effective, appropriate and safe for your school

  • Minimise risks from unwelcome users and deal with any negative publicity
  • The latest popular platforms and how they may impact on you and your pupils
  • Keep an eye on what parents, schools and others are saying about you

Promoting your school

  • How to set up a presence or develop an existing one in order to get maximum benefit
  • Ensuring that you are up to speed with all aspects of social media
  • Celebrating children’s work
  • Effective parental and community engagement
  • Marketing your school to potential parents
  • Managing your social media campaign successfully to achieve  results without taking up too much staff time

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

This course does not yet have a date and venue. To express an interest, please complete the form and we will contact you when details are available.

Your Name

Your Email

Your Phone

Your School

Postcode

Position in school eg head teacher, safeguarding lead, ICT Co-ordinator

I am interested in attending the following short course:
E-Safety Policy updateDigital leaders in your school360 E-Safe self review preparationOnline safety for school staffSocial Media for schoolsPlanning and delivering the computing curriculumUsing Scratch to teach computingApps for teaching computingBBC Micro:bit training for schoolsBBC Micro:bit RoboticsBBC Micro:bit Physical ComputingPreparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessmentGreen Screen and iMovie in the classroom

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National Pupil Internet Use survey

Schools across the UK were invited to take part in a national survey of internet use by pupils when at home.  Brett Laniosh from Catshill Learning Partnerships, who are carrying out the survey, said that the results will provide valuable information to schools on the range of hardware such as laptops, tablets, consoles and smart phones being used by young people. The survey is supported by education technology association Naace.

naace-transparent-logo

About the survey

Once signed up, schools were sent a survey form for completion in the Autumn 2016 term.

Each class was shown a number of devices and pupils were asked to show by raising their hand which they use at home.

The numbers will be collated for each school with the national results published for Safer Internet Day on February 7th 2017.

internetofthings

Results from the survey

National survey results from over 19,000 pupils in schools across the UK will be available here  on 30th January.

Schools can still carry out the survey and compare their results with the national average by completing the form below.

Your Name

Your Email

Your Phone

Your School

Postcode

Position in school (eg head teacher, ICT Co-ordinator etc)

Year groups required
KS1 (Reception, Year 1, Year 2, Year 3)KS2 (Year 4, Year 5, Year 6)KS3 (Year 7, Year 8, Year 9)KS4 (Year 10, Year 11)

Any other message

DfE Standards for CPD

A standard for teachers’ professional development has been issued by the DFE.

The Teachers’ Standards set out a number of expectations about professional development; namely, that teachers should:

  • Keep their knowledge and skills as teachers up-to-date and be self-critical;
  • Take responsibility for improving teaching through appropriate professional development, responding to advice and feedback from colleagues;
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how pupils learn and how this has an impact on teaching;
  • Have a secure knowledge of the relevant subject(s) and curriculum areas;
  • Reflect systematically on the effectiveness of lessons and approaches to teaching; and
  • Know and understand how to assess the relevant subject and curriculum areas.

DFEguidance

We at Catshill Learning Partnerships are proud to deliver professional development  courses and training that meets the published standard:

1Professional development should have a focus on improving and evaluating pupil outcomes.tick
2Professional development should be underpinned by robust evidence and expertise. tick
3Professional development should include collaboration and expert challenge. tick
4Professional development programmes should be sustained over time. tick
5And all this is underpinned by, and requires that: Professional development must be prioritised by school leadership tick

“Effective professional development for teachers is a core part of securing effective teaching. It cannot exist in isolation, rather it requires a pervasive culture of scholarship with a shared commitment for teachers to support one another to develop so that pupils benefit from the highest quality teaching.”
(Ref DFE-00167-2016)

BBC Microbit

Due to demand, Catshill Learning Partnerships have developed a BBC:Microbit training course for schools. Find out more.

The BBC have produced  a pocket-sized, computer that allows children to get creative with technology. The aim is to inspire digital creativity and develop a new generation of tech pioneers.

This ambitious education initiative gave a million devices to every 11 or 12 year old child in year 7 or equivalent across the UK.

The school based course is a great introduction that is suitable for staff and pupils and can be run in the school day or as a twilight after school.

microbit

Key features of the micro:bit include:

 • 25 red LEDs to light up, flash messages, create games and invent digital stories.

• Two programmable buttons activated when pressed. Use the micro:bit as a games controller. Pause or skip songs on a playlist.

• On-board motion detector or “accelerometer” that can detect movement and tell other devices you’re on the go. Featured actions include shake, tilt and freefall. Turn the micro:bit into a spirit level. Light it up when something is moved. Use it for motion-activated games.

• A built-in compass or “magnetometer” to sense which direction you’re facing, your movement in degrees, and where you are. Includes an in-built magnet, and can sense certain types of metal.

• Bluetooth Smart Technology to connect to the internet and interact with the world around you. Connect the micro:bit to other micro:bits, devices, kits, phones, tablets, cameras and everyday objects all around. Share creations or join forces to create multi-micro:bit masterpieces. Take a selfie. Pause a DVD or control your playlist.

• Five Input and Output (I/O) rings to connect the micro:bit to devices or sensors using crocodile clips or 4mm banana plugs. Use the micro:bit to send commands to and from the rings, to power devices like robots and motors.

Read more about the BBC Microbit project here.

Parents’ iPad Prize Draw

Our iPad prize draw is a great way to maximise parental engagement at Online Safety for Parents so we will be running it again for schools that book a presentation during September, October and November 2016.

Apple-iPad-mini

All parents attending Online Safety for Parents will be entered into a prize draw to win an iPad mini which has been kindly donated by Zeus IT Services.

ipad drawForestdale

Prize kindly donated by ZeusIT

Maximise parental engagement by promoting the iPad Prize Draw and there are more ideas here.

Parents Promo - IPAD

Progression in computing

If you’ve managed to map the computing curriculum and your teachers are delivering exciting lessons, how do you assess what is going on and ensure that there is progression?

A common myth is that progression is demonstrated by using different software. Moving from from Beebots to ScratchJnr to Scratch to Kodu to Python to PHP does NOT mean progression.

You can deliver A-level courses with Scratch and year two lessons with Scratch.  You may wish to consider progression pathways but is there a less challenging way to look at progression?

Progression at KS1 and KS2 Computing

The above screen shot is an alternative representation of the assessment grid that can be found in the excellent Computing in the Curriculum guide produced by our friends at CAS. We believe our version improves on the original. It doesn’t have numerical levels but shows steps for success. It also uses colour to identify the three themes of  computing (blue), IT (red) and digital literacy (green).

Download the KS1/2 and KS2/3 versions.

Work in progress – We are also developing a dynamic version of the progression map with every statement hyperlinked to practical advice. So when you are asked what “Use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs” means, you can click on the text that will take you to a page that explains (with pictures!) what it all means.  Get in touch if you’d like to know more about this project.

Make sense of the new computing curriculum with the new Day of Curriculum Planning

1:1 CPD for every teacher to get all staff up to speed with the new computing curriculum!

Find out more

planning materials