Malvern Festival of Innovation

Malvern Festival Partners

Children build their own robots at Malvern Festival of Innovation

  • Children from across the Midlands will be building their own robots at this year’s Malvern Festival of Innovation
  • Groups of children from ten different schools will be given the chance to build their own programmable robots at a series of workshops on Tuesday 3rd October at the Three Counties Showground
  • As well as building the robots (which will be donated to the schools), pupils will be shown how to programme them and carry out a series of challenges such as following a route through an obstacle course.
  • The robot building workshop has been organised by and will be run by Educational Technology guru Brett Laniosh from Bromsgrove based Catshill Learning Partnerships. The robots have been sponsored by global IT company CGI group
  • Building a robot is a creative process involving problem solving that promotes independent learning and gives children experience of real world physical computing, science, technology and mathematics

As sales of electric cars rise and government ministers have announced an £8 million fund for trials of driverless lorries, the next generation of technologists and engineers will be given an opportunity to see the tech in action and get hands on experience of robot building.

At a series of free workshops at the Malvern Festival of Innovation on Tuesday 3rd October, children from across the Midlands will be building and programming their own robots. The workshops have been organised by and will be run by EdTech guru Brett Laniosh from Bromsgrove based Catshill Learning Partnerships who works in schools to support and promote the safe and creative use of technology.

Brett said, “We wanted to introduce young people to robotics and engineering and these fun workshops will be an opportunity for 40 children from different schools to do just that. As well as developing problem solving skills, their finished robot will give the children a sense of achievement. It will also help to foster a love for science and technology. We are delighted that CGI Group has sponsored the workshops which will mean that the completed robots will be given to the schools to use in class. Who knows, perhaps one of these young robot builders will be part of a team that builds your next electric car or even a future Mars rover.”

About Catshill Learning Partnerships:

Catshill Learning Partnerships is a computing, ICT and online safety network, providing curriculum support and advice to schools. Established in 2011, its school-based services also include professional development and educational technology advice.

For more details, go to www.catshill.com email info@catshill.com or ring 01527 313 880

About Malvern Festival of Innovation:

The Next Generation Innovators Day runs on Tuesday 3rd October and takes place at the Three Counties Showground. The day showcases creative science, technology, and entrepreneurship for middle and senior school students (Years 7 to 9) from around the region. Teachers can bring their class to listen to lectures, participate in hands-on workshops, and tour an extensive exhibition of organisations. The event is free to attend, but schools (or home-educating parents) need to register in advance.

www.festival-innovation.com/programme/next-generation-innovators

 

Digital Leader Training

Our digital leader training courses are very popular with secondary, junior and first schools.

Digital Leader Schools

“Through constructive dialogue it encourages pupils, parents/carers, other stakeholders and the wider community to contribute to ongoing developments in e-safeguarding policy and practice, and helps them to deal with e-safeguarding challenges they encounter.” ictmarklogo
“There is coordinated and robust implementation of e-safeguarding policies by all staff, governors and pupils within and beyond the school and practice is monitored. The school engages regularly with stakeholders to promote the e-safeguarding of pupils and staff within and beyond the school.”360es
“Young people are themselves involved in e-safety education eg through peer mentoring.”

Find out more at catshill.com/digital-leaders 

Brett from Catshill Learning Partnerships came in to school for a day and worked with our year 7, 8 and 9 Digital Leaders in order to help them support the e-safety work we are engaged with. It was a very worthwhile and exciting day; the pupils found the experience meaningful and were able to create some great resources that will help the John Henry Newman community stay safe online. This work was invested back into school life to enable a proper coherent e-safety campaign designed and led by the Digital Leaders using Brett’s expertise.
Daniel Harvey, Head of Computing, John Henry Newman Catholic College, Solihull

We were given ideas and questions about The Chantry’s ICT state that were thought provoking and really helpful. Our consultant had great speaking and teaching skills; we learned a lot! He was very enthusiastic and motivational with the pupils and encouraged everyone to contribute! We now have lots of ideas to add to our progression with BYOD in the school. We would definitely recommend Catshill Learning to other Digital Leaders looking for some great training! We are going to keep in touch with Brett and his company and look forward to giving him a checkup on our progress in the future.
Jan Dowding, Head of Computing, The Chantry School, Worcester and the Digital Leaders Team

Ideas for Safer Internet Day

10 suggestions for the run up to Safer Internet Day 2018

Safer Internet Day runs on 6th February 2018. Here are some some inspiring ideas to consider for your school.

1Set up digital leaders in order to empower your pupilsFind out how
2Review your AUPs and online safety policiesFind out how
3Run a workshop for parentsFind out how
4Carry out a survey of internet use by pupilsFind out how
5Get your digital leaders to produce an e-safety game or blogFind out how
6Create an e-safety game in ScratchFind out how
7Run an online event for all your classesFind out how
8Get your pupils to run a showcase lesson for parents Find out how
9Update your staff on the new DfE guidelinesFind out how
10Carry out a review using the 360 ESafe toolFind out how

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Scratch 3

There is a lot of excitement about the development of Scratch 3 that is being jointly developed by MIT and Google.

Scratch 3 will be written in in HTML 3 and this widely anticipated release will be watched closely following the announcement that Adobe will be dropping Flash which is a requirement for the current version of Scratch 2.

A preview of the new scratch 3 blocks

It has been confirmed that Scratch 3 will continue to use vertical programming blocks rather than the horizontal ones used by ScratchJr.

A comparison of the horizontal and vertical block layout.

The announcement of Scratch 3.0 is going to be welcomed by users who are struggling to use this brilliant and popular programming tool in schools.

The Scratch Team at MIT will be affiliating with Google for this release which will succeed Scratch 2.

There are no details of a final release date for Scratch 3 but a functioning alpha version is available at here.

More details on from https://wiki.scratch.mit.edu/wiki/Scratch_3.0

 

Progression in computing

If you’ve managed to map the computing curriculum and your teachers are delivering exciting lessons, how do you assess what is going on and ensure that there is progression?

A common myth is that progression is demonstrated by using different software. Moving from from Beebots to ScratchJnr to Scratch to Kodu to Python to PHP does NOT mean progression.

You can deliver A-level courses with Scratch and year two lessons with Scratch.  You may wish to consider progression pathways but is there a less challenging way to look at progression?

Progression at KS1 and KS2 Computing

The above screen shot is an alternative representation of the assessment grid that can be found in the excellent Computing in the Curriculum guide produced by our friends at CAS. We believe our version improves on the original. It doesn’t have numerical levels but shows steps for success. It also uses colour to identify the three themes of  computing (blue), IT (red) and digital literacy (green).

Download the KS1/2 and KS2/3 versions.

Work in progress – We are also developing a dynamic version of the progression map with every statement hyperlinked to practical advice. So when you are asked what “Use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs” means, you can click on the text that will take you to a page that explains (with pictures!) what it all means.  Get in touch if you’d like to know more about this project.

Make sense of the new computing curriculum with the new Day of Curriculum Planning

1:1 CPD for every teacher to get all staff up to speed with the new computing curriculum!

Find out more

planning materials

New – Low Cost Robot

We’ve launched our new low cost Robot kit for the BBC Micro:bit. At just £25, the robot kit is great value and includes all the parts and instructions to make your own robot. A free programming guide allows you to write programs to control your robot.

The robot is a fully programmable, expandable device with activities for all ages. Supplied with clear instructions the kit takes about an hour to build. More than just a robot, this is a maker platform with numerous sensors, input & output add-ons for off-screen computing projects.

The robot kit is available from catshill.com/robot which also contains the build instructions, programming guide and downloadable resources.

The robot is programmed using programmable blocks which will be familiar to those who use Scratch.

Digital Leaders Report

Matthew Payne, the chairman of Chantry School Digital Leaders has sent us an update of their activities. If you do not yet have Digital Leaders, find out more here.

In early February Myself, Ms Dowding and The Digital Leaders of The Chantry School embarked on a journey to a college in Birmingham to attend a Digital Leaders workshop and conference. It gave us the opportunity to share our practices and learn about how other groups work. I presented Trello, which is our collaboration and organisational tool, that other schools found useful to know of.

 Safer Internet Day 2017

Shortly after the Digital Leader Conference, Safer Internet Day 2017 took place. As we’ve done for two years, I took to the stage and presented assemblies to all year groups throughout the week. I shared advice for what to look out for when speaking to others online and an unfortunate story of a local teenager who took his own life after receiving online bullying for many years even after moving schools two times. The Digital Leaders and I sincerely hope that our message of: “Is it true, is it kind and is it necessary?” will play a larger part in the pupil’s social media activity.

So as I’m sure you can appreciate, the Digital Leaders have been up to a lot to help make the school more digitally safe! The group is now working hard on getting our messages and knowledge across to parents directly with our Parental Involvement Program. We are now actively working with parents at school events and through our newsletter column and other platforms to help parents understand what their children are doing online.

Matthew Payne, Chairman of The Digital Leaders, Year 10, Chantry School, Worcester 

How to set up digital leaders in your school.

Internet Use Survey – Free resource

Interpreting the results of the National Pupil Internet Use Survey

The free classroom resource

Schools across the UK were invited to take part in a national survey of internet use by pupils when at home. Over 19,000 pupils took part.

A free teaching resource that uses the results from the survey which were published for Safer Internet Day 2017 has been created for schools to use. 

The resource presents a series of questions made up  into 26 slides that can be delivered in the classroom as it is or modified to suit a range of ages and abilities. It can be used to promote and stimulate online safety discussion.

Complete the form below to receive the classroom resource.

You can also download the results of the survey here.

Your Name

Your Email

School

Postcode

Country if non-UK

Position in school (eg head teacher, ICT Co-ordinator etc)

Please send me a copy of the National Pupil Internet Use Survey classroom resource

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Computing with Scratch

Hands on training using the brilliant free programming tool.

We can deliver this course at your school  – Complete the form below

A short high impact course for teachers

Scratch unifyscratchexample
Ideal for
Head of Computing ICT/Computing teachers – Secondary or Primary Phase

When it comes to computing apps, Scratch always comes at the top of any popularity poll and for good reason – the award winning programming tool makes it really easy to code, it promotes creativity and it is completely free! That is why both children and adults love using it.

If you or your staff would like to familiarise yourself with, or get to know more about Scratch and learn some great tips for using this brilliant free tool in school, this course is for you.

  • A cost effective way of implementing programming.
  • Uses fun, exciting and free software that encourages high level thinking and creativity.
  • Can be used with year 3 to year 9.
  • Covers the interface, sprites, command blocks and everything you need to know.
  • Linked to the computing programme of study.
  • This practical course assumes no prior knowledge.
“Super ideas and resources to take straight back to school and staff. Thank you.” Victoria Ward, The Oval School, Yardley.  “Really useful course if you are new to the subject.” Richard Martin, Abbey Park Middle School, Pershore. “Brett delivers an informative and intriguing introduction to Scratch. Providing a hands on course, teaching staff will get a real feel for the flexibility of the program whilst being made aware of the national curriculum elements that it covers.” Thomas Smith, Westacre Middle School, Droitwich.

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

We can deliver this course at your school. Complete this form for more details.

Your Name

Your Email

Your Phone

Your School

Postcode

Position in school eg head teacher, safeguarding lead, ICT Co-ordinator

I am interested in attending/hosting the following short course:
E-Safety Policy updateDigital leaders in your school360 E-Safe self review preparationOnline safety for school staffSocial Media for schoolsPlanning and delivering the computing curriculumUsing Scratch to teach computingApps for teaching computingBBC Micro:bit training for schoolsBBC Micro:bit RoboticsBBC Micro:bit Physical ComputingPreparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessmentGreen Screen and iMovie in the classroom

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360 Online Safety Course

Preparing for the 360safe E-Safety review

We can deliver this course at your school  – Complete the form below

A short high impact course for teachers

Ideal for
Senior leaders/Safeguarding lead/Computing/ICT lead – Secondary or Primary Phase

Help with completing the 360safe online safety review in order to ensure that online safety is embedded across your school. The 360 self review tool is free to use and it is worth carrying out your own review even if you decide not to apply for the Online Safety Mark for which there is a charge.

As well as explaining the process, the presenter will outline the issues that schools have when completing the review or going for accreditation. During the afternoon you will work on your own review, so attending could be a valuable time saver.

The course will explain the elements, strands and aspects of the tool – Policy and Leadership; Infrastructure; Education; Standards and Inspection

It will cover the key areas required and help you to complete the 360safe online safety review and/or get ready for assessment.

  • A process for identifying strengths and weaknesses of existing practice
  • Responsibilities and relevant stakeholders
  • Help in identifying your existing levels
  • Guidance and best practice
  • Templates and updates using best practices
  • An action plan for your school

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

We can deliver this course at your school. Complete this form for more details.

Your Name

Your Email

Your Phone

Your School

Postcode

Position in school eg head teacher, safeguarding lead, ICT Co-ordinator

I am interested in attending/hosting the following short course:
E-Safety Policy updateDigital leaders in your school360 E-Safe self review preparationOnline safety for school staffSocial Media for schoolsPlanning and delivering the computing curriculumUsing Scratch to teach computingApps for teaching computingBBC Micro:bit training for schoolsBBC Micro:bit RoboticsBBC Micro:bit Physical ComputingPreparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessmentGreen Screen and iMovie in the classroom

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Build a robot Course

Build a robot to use with the BBC Micro:bit.

We can deliver this course at your school  – Complete the form below for details

A short high impact course for teachers

Ideal for
Head of Computing ICT/Computing teachers – Secondary or Primary Phase

You will build a BBC Micro:bit robot that is yours to keep. Once built you will be shown how to program your robot using programming blocks just like Scratch.  This course demystifies the tech and is suitable for everyone.

  • A great way to introduce robotics
  • Step by step instructions to built your robot
  • Fun, hands on training for staff that you can use in the classroom
  • We will show you how to write programs to control your robot
  • The robot is yours to keep at the end of the course!

A fantastic way to make best use of this importance device. 

  • All you need to know about the hardware and how to program it
  • You will learn how to write programs for your robot using the block editor
  • You can purchase additional robots for just £25 each
  • No coding or technical experience needed – this course is suitable for everyone
  • You will need to bring your BBC Micro:bit and 4 AA batteries with you. Get in touch if you need to borrow a Micro:bit on the day.

“I found the building of the robot challenging, but also satisfying to see it fully in action. This was useful in terms of ideas for  differentiation.” Cecilia Rooms, Whiteheath Education Centre “Very useful to encourage the development of coding by using a physical component.” Neil Hartley, Edgbaston High School  “Thank you – I can see how this would be excellent for all of our children from Y5 to Y8.”  Kate Brown, St Bede’s Catholic Middle School MAC

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £69 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience
 

We can deliver this course at your school. Complete this form for more details.

Your Name

Your Email

Your Phone

Your School

Postcode

Position in school eg head teacher, safeguarding lead, ICT Co-ordinator

I am interested in attending/hosting the following short course:
E-Safety Policy updateDigital leaders in your school360 E-Safe self review preparationOnline safety for school staffSocial Media for schoolsPlanning and delivering the computing curriculumUsing Scratch to teach computingApps for teaching computingBBC Micro:bit training for schoolsBBC Micro:bit RoboticsBBC Micro:bit Physical ComputingPreparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessmentGreen Screen and iMovie in the classroom

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Pupils online: advice for schools

We know that children are using a wide range of technology to get online at home, including games consoles, tablets and even their parents’ smartphones. This has led to a number of concerns, the main one being the issue of safeguarding and digital security. With the huge variety of potential access points to the internet, how can schools educate their pupils for all eventualities?

At Catshill Learning Partnerships, we’ve been running online safety lessons in schools for a number of years. At the beginning of these sessions, we always ask the pupils what devices they have used or had access to at home. The responses to this are always fascinating; children from as early as reception are already using a vast range of technology. We have carried out a National Pupil Internet Use Survey in order to examine how children access online content in more detail. Find out more at catshill.com/survey19k

 Unchartered territory

The main problem with technology is that both schools and parents are not necessarily familiar with the ways in which their pupils and children are accessing online content. For example, games consoles can now be used to communicate with other players around the world, and also access platforms such as YouTube and even Facebook.

The Pupil Internet Use Survey showed that 50% of 4/5 year olds say that they use their mum and dad’s smartphones. In fact, young pupils tend to be quite adept at using these types of technology, and will often help struggling parents or grandparents to get to grips with their devices. It is therefore important to instil good cyber security practices into pupils at an early age.

While filtering and restriction systems can help limit the content that children can access on their devices, if that device is taken to a friend’s house, the same controls may not apply, so understanding exactly what can be accessed and how is essential for parents. We are encouraging teachers to ask questions about such issues to both students and parents, to ensure that these considerations are taken into account.

Addressing the issue

The main thing is to make sure that what children are doing with the technology is done safely so that they’re not putting themselves in danger by going to a site that’s not suitable, and when they are online that they are behaving in an appropriate way. The most important thing to check is that they are not sharing personal information publicly or with strangers online without considering what they are doing.

Children often won’t see the harm in posting content about themselves, especially if their parents are doing the same thing. Part of the problem is that not everyone understands the privacy settings on platforms like Facebook, meaning that their content is available publicly for the world to see. Parents need to lead by example and take the time to consider their own social media activity. Staying safe online is an important life skill for everyone.

It should be remembered that there are many new social apps beyond the big players like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, such as Yik Yak and Oovoo. It can be difficult to keep on top of all this, so schools can help by running regular sessions for both their staff and parents to ensure that everyone has the latest information and that they understand what’s out there.

Voice of the children

Everyone has a responsibility when it comes to online safety, whether that’s parents, teachers or pupils. I am keen for schools to set up Digital Leader programmes, where groups of pupils are able to pass on messages about safety and cyber security in a voice that other young people are more likely to resonate with. There’s also the opportunity for students to help in writing the school’s online safety guide, as they will often have more insight into the newer trends online for people their age, and consequently, become your most valuable resource in this process. For example, the Digital Leaders we helped to set up at the Chantry School in Worcester present assemblies to year groups and share advice for what to look out for when speaking to others online. They also work hard to get messages and knowledge across to parents directly with a Parental Involvement Program. Find out more at catshill.com/chantry Similarly the Digital Leaders we set up for Westacre Middle School in Droitwich are running showcase lessons for parents to show them the range of cloud technology they use in school and at home. Find out more at catshill.com/showcase_lessons

We need to take a step back and evaluate the risks, so that everyone understands the multitude of possibilities online and how they can be managed effectively and safely.

BBC Micro:bit course

Make the most of your free BBC computers and find out what they can do…

We can deliver this course at your school  – Complete the form below for details

A short high impact course for teachers

bbc-microbitThe Micro:bit is designed to encourage children to get actively involved in writing software for computers and building new things, rather than being consumers of media. A million devices have been given to every year 7 pupil in the UK.  This course demystifies the tech and explains how to make the most of your devices.

  • Don’t let your free BBC Micro:bits end up in dusty cupboards
  • Fun, hands on training for staff
  • We will show you how to write programs and ensure that you are familiar with the hardware
Ideal for
Head of Computing ICT/Computing teachers – Secondary or Primary Phase

A fantastic way to make best use of this importance device. 

  • All you need to know about the hardware and how to program it
  • You will learn how to write programs using the block editor, touch develop and python
  • How to connect to other devices such as an LED and headphones
  • No coding or technical experience needed – this course is suitable for everyone
“Good to discuss with other teachers.” Chris Howard, Abbey Park Middle School “I found the hands on coding really useful and I am looking forward to teaching some of this to our current year 7’s.” Richard Martin, Abbey Park Middle School “The course is a very useful introduction to the hardware and coding activities that can be carried out with the BBC micro:bit. It gives you the opportunity to try some hands on activities with the micro:bit.” Cheryl Jarvis, Catshill Middle School “Good short introduction – great overview of functionality and applications available. Brett is very engaging and maintains a good pace throughout.” Carolyn Aynsworth, Malvern St James Girls’ School

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience
 

We can deliver this course at your school. Complete this form for more details.

Your Name

Your Email

Your Phone

Your School

Postcode

Position in school eg head teacher, safeguarding lead, ICT Co-ordinator

I am interested in attending/hosting the following short course:
E-Safety Policy updateDigital leaders in your school360 E-Safe self review preparationOnline safety for school staffSocial Media for schoolsPlanning and delivering the computing curriculumUsing Scratch to teach computingApps for teaching computingBBC Micro:bit training for schoolsBBC Micro:bit RoboticsBBC Micro:bit Physical ComputingPreparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessmentGreen Screen and iMovie in the classroom

Any other message

Children online – 19,000 surveyed

Pupils online: National survey of 19,000 UK pupils reveals new trends in children’s internet use

The the survey results can be downloaded below and a free teaching resource is available here.

  • The results of a national pupil survey on internet use have been released, taking data from over 60 schools and 19,000 pupils
  • Primary-aged pupils are most frequently using tablets and smartphones to access the internet
  • With greater access to the internet, concerns have been raised around the content that is accessible by young children, and how this can be combated effectively

Catshill Learning Partnerships, along with education technology association, Naace, have announced the results from a national survey of pupils’ internet use at home.

The survey, which involved over 60 schools and over 19,000 pupils from across the UK, asked questions about the devices young people are using to get online. As expected, the results show that children of all ages are using a wide range of devices, but the figures for very young children surprisingly revealed that over 60 per cent of four to five-year-olds are using tablets to get online. The tablet is the online device of choice for primary children, but for secondary school-aged children, the smartphone is the most popular choice.

Key figures from the study show that:

  • Nearly half of four to seven-year-old children surveyed say they are using a smartphone to get online
  • 66 per cent of Year 7 pupils and 89 per cent of Year 10 pupils use a smartphone, which is the most popular method of accessing the internet
  • Over half of six-year-olds use a laptop to get online
  • Games consoles are used mostly by 10 and 11-year-olds with three main platforms (Xbox, Playstation and Wii) being popular
  • A wide range of other connected devices were being used at home. The most popular devices in the ‘Internet of Things’ category were other consoles such as the Nintendo DS, heating controls, smart meters and portable media devices. Smart fridges and kettles were mentioned but less common.

Edtech and online safety consultant, Brett Laniosh, from Catshill Learning Partnerships said, “We now know that children are using a wide range of technology to get online at home, but the findings for younger children will surprise many. The fact that so many four and five-year-olds are using smartphones and tablets to access what could be unfiltered content is of concern and one that is echoed by the Children’s Commissioners report “Growing up Digital” released earlier this month.

“We would encourage schools to find out what devices their pupils are using at home and then compare their results with the national average.” Brett added, “I would also encourage schools to heed the advice of the Children’s Commissioner and establish Digital Leaders in school to get young people involved with the delivery of online safety education. For parents, it is vital to speak with your children to find out what hardware they have access to and which ones are being used to access online content. The discussion should also cover whether they are being used appropriately, for example protecting personal privacy and spending an appropriate amount of time using them.”

Download the Survey Results here

 

About Catshill Learning Partnerships:

Catshill Learning Partnerships is an independent computing, ICT and e-safety consultant network, providing curriculum support to schools. Established in 2011, its school-based services also include professional development and educational technology advice.

Catshill Learning Partnerships are Naace Delivery Partners. A national network of trusted educational organisations who work together to provide quality support services for schools.

For more details, please email info@catshill.com or ring 01527 313 880

 

About Naace:

Naace is the national association for everyone promoting learning with technology in a connected world.  Naace is the professional association for those concerned with advancing education by capitalising on the opportunities of the connected world and technology. This involves advancing pedagogy and ensuring that strong computing knowledge and skills are spread to all pupils and all teachers. The Naace community provides support and professional development opportunities for teachers and school leaders.  Our membership also includes advisers, consultants and industry partners.  Naace administers the ICT Mark and the Self-review Framework and has developed the Third Millennium Learning award to enable schools to share their insights on how to take education to the next level.

http://www.naace.co.uk

 

 

Short High Impact Courses

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Held at conveniently located Centres of Excellence with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience
LocationCentre of Excellence
DroitwichWestacre Middle School
RedditchThe Vaynor First School
WorcesterThe Chantry School

Find out more about the courses

Curriculum planning

How to implement an effective computing curriculum. Covers the complete programme of study. Ideal for those who have to teach computing.

A short high impact course for teachers

planning materials

Ideal for
Head of Computing/ ICT and Computing teachers – Secondary or Primary Phase

This course covers the complete Computing programme of study including ICT and Digital Literacy.

  • Plan a meaningful curriculum that can be delivered by all your staff.
  • How to deliver exciting lessons in order to meet statutory requirements.
  • Technological words explained, so that you will understand difficult concepts such as algorithms and abstraction.
  • Complete coverage from reception to year nine.

Key resources and practical advice

  • A staff survey that can be used to record understanding and confidence levels.
  • A list of objectives and complete curriculum overview for every year that you can use straight away.
  • Use and create programmes using award winning and free software.
  • Review of schemes of work.

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

We can deliver this course at your school. Complete this form for more details.

Your Name

Your Email

Your Phone

Your School

Postcode

Position in school eg head teacher, safeguarding lead, ICT Co-ordinator

I am interested in attending/hosting the following short course:
E-Safety Policy updateDigital leaders in your school360 E-Safe self review preparationOnline safety for school staffSocial Media for schoolsPlanning and delivering the computing curriculumUsing Scratch to teach computingApps for teaching computingBBC Micro:bit training for schoolsBBC Micro:bit RoboticsBBC Micro:bit Physical ComputingPreparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessmentGreen Screen and iMovie in the classroom

Any other message

 

Naace ICT Mark Course

Preparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessment

A short high impact course for teachers

ictmark

Ideal for
ICT lead/Head of Computing/ Senior leaders – Primary or Secondary Phase

This course is will help schools who are working through the Self-review Framework (SRF) and towards the ICT Mark. It is also suitable for schools who are considering ICT Mark assessment.

Each element of the SRF will be clarified. Information and resources to help understand the evidence required for assessment will be provided.

Areas of focus 

  • An understanding of the elements of the SRF
  • Consistency in applying judgements of threshold for the ICT Mark
  • Identifying and working with relevant and important stakeholders in school
  • The assessment process – How it works and what type of evidence you require
  • Be able to identify an appropriate route though the SRF and plan the journey

Elements covered

  • Leadership and Management
  • Planning and Learning
  • Computing and Capability
  • Evaluating the impact of ICT
  • Professional Development and Resources

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

We can deliver this course at your school. Complete this form for more details.

Your Name

Your Email

Your Phone

Your School

Postcode

Position in school eg head teacher, safeguarding lead, ICT Co-ordinator

I am interested in attending/hosting the following short course:
E-Safety Policy updateDigital leaders in your school360 E-Safe self review preparationOnline safety for school staffSocial Media for schoolsPlanning and delivering the computing curriculumUsing Scratch to teach computingApps for teaching computingBBC Micro:bit training for schoolsBBC Micro:bit RoboticsBBC Micro:bit Physical ComputingPreparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessmentGreen Screen and iMovie in the classroom

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Apps for Computing course

Hands on training  to show the best tools and apps for teaching computing on tablets

A short high impact course for teachers

 

 iPad-Air-vs-iPad-miniscratchjr

 

Ideal for
Any teacher or TA that teaches computing – Primary Phase

Programming can be challenging without a keyboard but there are some great apps out there that can be used to to deliver the computing curriculum.

This course will cover a range of recommended apps for use on iPads and Android tablets.

  • Recommended, proven free apps
  • Covered  apps – Pyonkee, Snap!, Touch Develop, J2Code, 2Code, Kodable,  Hopscotch
  • Hands on in detail with ScratchJr, Run Marco and Lightbot
  • Gives schools a cost effective way of implementing programming
  • Suitable for all teachers regardless of their teaching and
    training experience
  • Linked to the computing programme of study

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

We can deliver this course at your school. Complete this form for more details.

Your Name

Your Email

Your Phone

Your School

Postcode

Position in school eg head teacher, safeguarding lead, ICT Co-ordinator

I am interested in attending/hosting the following short course:
E-Safety Policy updateDigital leaders in your school360 E-Safe self review preparationOnline safety for school staffSocial Media for schoolsPlanning and delivering the computing curriculumUsing Scratch to teach computingApps for teaching computingBBC Micro:bit training for schoolsBBC Micro:bit RoboticsBBC Micro:bit Physical ComputingPreparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessmentGreen Screen and iMovie in the classroom

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Online Safety for School Staff

Essential information for school staff

A short high impact course for teachers

Ideal for
All staff/NQTs/TAs – Secondary or Primary Phase

The essential things you need to know about how you and your pupils can stay safe online and referring to the DFE statutory guidance ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education’.

  • Technology in use at home including the Internet of Things
  • Personal and professional issues
  • Vulnerability
  • Grooming
  • Cyber-bullying
  • Sexting
  • Radicalisation
  • Social media including Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and Instagram

As well as the areas above, this course gives helpful guidance to teachers about protecting their online identity and suggests practical steps that schools can use to implement effective E-Safety procedures.

  • Protecting yourself – practical advice
  • Key stakeholders – parents, governors, safeguarding boards, agencies such as CEOP and Childnet
  • Essential resources and proven strategies
  • Best practice
  • Reporting procedures

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

We can deliver this course at your school. Complete this form for more details.

Your Name

Your Email

Your Phone

Your School

Postcode

Position in school eg head teacher, safeguarding lead, ICT Co-ordinator

I am interested in attending/hosting the following short course:
E-Safety Policy updateDigital leaders in your school360 E-Safe self review preparationOnline safety for school staffSocial Media for schoolsPlanning and delivering the computing curriculumUsing Scratch to teach computingApps for teaching computingBBC Micro:bit training for schoolsBBC Micro:bit RoboticsBBC Micro:bit Physical ComputingPreparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessmentGreen Screen and iMovie in the classroom

Any other message

Green screen iMovie course

The use of Green Screen and iMovie to enhance learning in the classroom.

A short high impact course for teachers

Ideal for
Computing co-ordinators/Class teachers/NQTs  – Primary Phase

This is a practical course which will enable you to become computing proficient in using a green screen.  It is not essential to have a green screen within your school – learn how to make one of your own!  In addition, you will learn how to create BAFTA award winning iMovies to enhance the children’s learning experience across the curriculum.

  • How does a green screen impact on children’s learning?
  • How to use a green screen.
  • How to create a DIY green screen.
  • How to merge green screen clips using an iPad/ MacBook for dummies 🙂
  • How to use iMovies to enhance children’s learning across all curriculum areas.

This course is presented by Sophie Thomas. Although not essential, it would be helpful to bring a Macbook or iPad to this course.

High impact courses for teachers covering a range of themes including school improvement and higher level thinking, technology and computing, safeguarding and online safety.

  • Cost effective – just £49 per delegate (£29 for additional delegates from same school)
  • Minimum disruption – High Impact courses run from 1pm to 3pm
  • Conveniently located course venues with refreshments included
  • Delivered by experienced learning practitioners and professionals with years of educational experience

We can deliver this course at your school. Complete this form for more details.

Your Name

Your Email

Your Phone

Your School

Postcode

Position in school eg head teacher, safeguarding lead, ICT Co-ordinator

I am interested in attending/hosting the following short course:
E-Safety Policy updateDigital leaders in your school360 E-Safe self review preparationOnline safety for school staffSocial Media for schoolsPlanning and delivering the computing curriculumUsing Scratch to teach computingApps for teaching computingBBC Micro:bit training for schoolsBBC Micro:bit RoboticsBBC Micro:bit Physical ComputingPreparing for the Naace ICT Mark assessmentGreen Screen and iMovie in the classroom

Any other message